Tag Archives: Progstravaganza

Eryn Non Dae.

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: Eryn Non Dae.

France’s Eryn Non Dae. gives the metal scene exactly what is needed – something unique, groundbreaking, and a new style of extreme to follow upon. Much like fellow homeland heroes Gojira and Hacride, END. pulls off a signature sound that can immediately be picked up by the metal critics.

Read the Progstravaganza Questionnaire, answered by the band’s bassist Mickael André.

How did you come to do what you do?

Mickael André (bass): Franck and Yann, the two guitar player are making music together since a very long time, they decided to make a band and slowly Eryn Non Dae came to its actual form.

What is your first musical memory?

Personnaly it must came from my parents, and must be old french singer like Georges Brassens or Charles Aznavour, Jacques brel, this kind of singer my mother used to listen to all the time, nothing to do with metal but it’s the first music I remember having heard…

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

Life and what we have inside of us, we’re always trying to express whio we are and what we have inside our heart.

What message does the song on our Progstravaganza compilation carry?

That song speaks about metamorphosis, it’s Meliora concept and this song is the final song on the album, it deals with somebody trying to rise, to evolve from its condition to something better.

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

Not at all, we always try to follow what’s coming with each song, but we realised some time ago that a lot of our song can be splitted in two parts, songs like « When time elapses » or « The decline and the fall » for example and it’s completely unconscious when we write it…

How do you see your music evolving?

It’s a very hard question, I believe we all want to make it better by working even harder on each side of our music but to speak very personnaly I would love to explore new sounds and something more cinematic, something full of new elements compared to our other album, but it’s quite personnal and each of us within the band has its own will and expectations…

What is your method of songwriting?

We very often start from guitar riffs and add everything very slowly, then we record it raw and then modify everything until were fully satisfied with everything, a song is never finished until each of us is exactly pleased with everything, it’s a very long process for us, I hope we will try to work diferently on the next album, but time will tell….

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

Be aware and curious. Just follow your heart, it’s the most honest way to create something, and even if what you do doesn’t interest a lot of people, I believe that it’s infinitely most rewarding producing smething that trully comes from you instead of making something that is not you. This is the way I see thing when it comes to music and even art in general.

What are you looking forward to?

Wow…writing good music, express ourselves and visiting other places.

Links:

http://www.erynnondae.com/

https://www.facebook.com/ERYNNONDAEofficial

Bands, send your music submissions for the Progstravaganza compilation series to info@prog-sphere.com

Personal Signet on Progstravaganza compilation

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: Personal Signet

Raw and uniquely sounding guitars merging with strong vocal melodies accompanied by top-level musicianship of all band members. That is Personal Signet, a group of amazing instrumentalists and gifted songwriters from the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Personal Signet’s music stands somewhere in between art rock and progressive metal, often being spiced up by electronic arrangements and programming.

Check them out on the Progstravaganza XVII: Progression and read the questionnaire.

How did you come to do what you do?

We have been writing music from early days and we all met at a music workshop in Czech republic in 2003. We found out our music visions were very much alike, one thing went to another and we started playing live. The feedback was good so we figured it would be a pity not to continue and now we are about to release our second full length album already.

What is your first musical memory?

Listening to Pink Floyd – The Wall on vinyl as a 5 year old. And humming Slovak folk songs prior to discovering Pink Floyd.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

We listen to tons of new music everyday. Everything is so easy to reach and find these days which is amazing and also slightly frightening. As I said I started out listening to Pink Floyd and Peter Gabriel as a kid. Then the 90’s and the grunge period came followed by the Brit pop era. I totally fell in love with bands like Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, Blur and others. Nowadays I think we are pretty open minded when it comes to music genres and we digest everything what we feel has something to say to us.

What message does the song on our Progstravaganza compilation carry?

The song Wires carries the message of conflict between humans and technology. We tend to spend too much time with electronic devices, internet and social media in a kind of twisted reality. We feel the real life is different and it’s important to preserve friendships elswhere then on Facebook or via tablets and iphones. All these devices and platforms are surely amazing but we try to keep everything in a „in moderation“ mode.

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

The tracks usually come out of live rehearsals. Then we play around with ideas and the lyrics usually come last.

Personal Signet

Personal Signet

What is your method of songwriting?

See the answer above.

How do you see your music evolving?

I think it’s evolving in a less metal and more art-rock/experimental way and hopefully poeple like it.

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

Be open minded, be yourself and be nice to people.

What are you looking forward to?

We are really excited for our new video Wires which is about to drop soon.

Links:

http://www.personalsignet.com

https://www.facebook.com/personalsignet

Bands, send your music submissions for the Progstravaganza compilation series to info@prog-sphere.com

Basta on Progstravaganza compilation

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: Basta

Basta are instrumental progressive rock band coming from Castelfranco di Sopra in Tuscany, Italy. They answered Progstravaganza Questionnaire.

How did you come to do what you do?

We just put together the instruments we liked to play! The result is an original mix between standard-rock elements (drum’n'bass, electric guitar), classical elements (bass clarinet), and some unexpected frequencies (made by a melodion!)

What is your first musical memory?

Our first live (that’s what you’re asking about, right?) was a kind of rock jam-session. Prog riffs plus simple chords with solos. Three years ago. That’s how everything began.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

Prog has always been in our DNA, like metal and classical music. So, we take inspiration from Dream Theater, King Crimson, Frank Zappa, Gentle Giant, and, in Italy, PFM and Banco del Mutuo Soccorso.

What message does the song on our Progstravaganza compilation carry?

It’s hard to answer, because we are a totally instrumental band! Anyway, the song we chose is “Mondi Paralleli”, “Parallel Worlds”. It’s like a role-playing game between the different elements of the music: rhythm, harmony, melody. A game in which there is sometimes dialogue, sometimes fight, sometimes exchanges of parts, sometimes interpenetration, sometimes sudden detachment, always dynamic tension. Like life.

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

Absolutely not. Or, to be more precise: our patterns are our lives and Chianti wine!

Basta - instrumental prog rock from Tuscany

Basta – instrumental prog rock from Tuscany

What is your method of songwriting?

In the last time we started writing all together from a zero-point, whereas before we started from an idea of one of the members.

How do you see your music evolving?

Now we have a bass player, from september 2013. So, our music is evolving towards a more defined and rich rhythmic section. On the other hand, the clarinet can develop its full melodic power, interweaving with the melodion. The guitar remains the backbone, linking all the rest and giving stability to the whole.

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

Be original! There are too many copies of copies. And, on the other hand, listen to all kinds of music: originality is not to create things out of nothing, but to create oneself out of the real world, the world of the others.

What are you looking forward to?

We are working on the next album, and we search for a label. But, above all, we’d like to find live dates, especially rock-prog festivals… in all the world!!

Links:

www.bastapuntoesclamativo.it

https://www.facebook.com/Bastapuntoesclamativo

Bands, send your music submissions for the Progstravaganza compilation series to info@prog-sphere.com

Structural Disorder

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: Structural Disorder

Structural Disorder is a progressive metal group formed in Stockholm, Sweden in September 2011.

The band consists of Markus Tälth (guitar/vocals), Jóhannes West (electric accordion/vocals), Hjalmar Birgersson (guitar/vocals), Erik Arkö (bass/vocals) and Karl Björk (drums).

The band was featured on Progstravaganza XVII: Progression and here is what they had to say.

How did you come to do what you do?

Erik: The progressive genre felt like the ”natural choice” for us, mostly due to the fact that there are “no restrictions” to what you can and can’t do within the genre (At least in theory – sometimes I wonder how “progressive” the progressive genre is.) I guess the name and the very being of the genre has gone from being the definition of something that wants to expand the borders of music to being something that defines a certain sound and certain aspects of the music (The odd meters, the long songs, the jazz-influences etc.). And don’t get me wrong – I love the genre and the music, but this is something that has crossed my mind a few times.

What is your first musical memory?

Erik: For me, I think it’s either Jan Johansson (”Jazz på Svenska”) or Count Basie (The “Atomic”-album). The defining moment for me, that drew me in to metal though was the time when I saw the video for “Renegade” by HammerFall on TV.

Karl: I can’t really remember my first musical memory. But the moment that led to my musical path was the first time I heard “Kiss alive two” with the drumsolo on “God of thunder”. Which coincidentally was during the same time as we were learning the basics in drumset playing in school.

Hjalmar: I don’t actually remember this, but I have been told by a reliable source (my mom) that I was really into Paul Simon’s Graceland when I was two. Also, I do remember borrowing a mixtape of Electric Light Orchestra songs from my mom and listening to it repeatedly until there was literally only noise left on the tape.

Markus: I can’t really remember my first, but I do know that I got into metal when I was around eleven, with bands such as Dimmu Borgir and Marduk. Dimmu’s Puritanical album had just been released and my brother brought it home, and I got fascinated with how it sounded and how fast they played. But it wasn’t until I got into Opeth some years later that my eyes really open for music and genres.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

Erik: Everything from Meshuggah and Behemoth to Eva Cassidy and Sting.. And everyday situations, movies and books…

Hjalmar: I think it’s hard not to give a really general answer to this question. For me, I have some musicians that never fail to inspire me, such as Daniel Gildenlöw, Devin Townsend, Esbjörn Svensson (rest in peace), Magnus Öström, Jem Godfrey, Fin Greenall, etc. Also, there is an ever-changing array of new discoveries (or rediscoveries). And of course, there are sources of inspiration in other things than music as well. I am greatly inspired by rainy days, quantum physics and dark and twisted TV shows such as The X-files and Fringe. I am sure everyone else would have a quite different list.

Markus: My inspiration is very subconscious. Most of the time when I write music it just comes totally unconnected to something else. There are a few times where I write songs that are in directly inspired by something, or even if I notice later that it sounds like something else, it had been subconscious during the writing process. But when that happens, I most often gets inspired by the latest thing I listened to.

What message does the song on our Progstravaganza compilation carry?

Johannes: The song is the closing act of our eponymous debut concept album. The story as told through the lyrics focuses around the feelings that a mentally ill man experiences while locked up in an institution. He is painfully dealing with and re-exploring the events from the outburst of his mental illness, and learning about what happened to the people that he loves. This track represents an open end to the story; the protagonist has fully realized the chain of events that brought him there, and he has escaped the delusional phase. But the tragedies of the past have put him in a state of apathy. During the development of the song, however, he transcends into another state of mind, looking for forgiveness and trying to find peace. Whether he finds it, and whether he is released from his mental and physical cell or not, is probably better left unanswered.

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

Johannes: Well, I would say no. When we are composing for the band (and there are a number of composers among us, and sometimes we write together as well) I would say most of us write what we like to write; If it fits into our musical bag then we’ll use it. Our sound also has a range of musical environments and types of songs within itself, making the boundaries less easy to cross. Structural Disorder is the creative force of its members, combined one way or another. Also, this is a good thing about a genre like ours that is generous when it comes to style definitions.

Structural Disorder

Structural Disorder (Photo by Philip Wessman)

What is your method of songwriting?

Either we jam out new riffs/melodies in our rehearsal place or write stuff (sometimes entire songs) at home that we present to the rest of the band – sometimes it’s just an embryo, which gives everyone in the band a lot of freedom when it comes to the arrangement and other times the song is pretty set in its structure and arrangement.

How do you see your music evolving?

The songs that we are writing now feel like the “natural progression”, considering what we wrote for “The Edge of Sanity”. We constantly try to challenge ourselves technically – but without the cost of a good song, so to speak.

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

Erik: Listen to all kinds of music – even stuff that you normally wouldn’t listen to! If you love metal – try to listen to some jazz, if you like pop then give Meshuggah a go and try to find something that you enjoy with every type of music.

Karl: Strive towards writing music for yourself before trying to write music that you think that other people might like. There is a convincing honesty that people react to in a positive way when you play something that you personally think is so good that you don’t really care if you are the only one who really like it. It may not be the recipe to reach millions of dollars in your account, but people do tend to see through you if try to write songs with the sole purpose of trying to make money or gain celebrity status.

What are you looking forward to?

Johannes: Like with the release of our debut album, it is so wonderful to get a piece of the excitement coming from people that enjoy our music. It is something really personal about it since our music is personal and we feel that we really can contribute when other people from all over the world appear to like it, sometimes very much. I hope that this happiness I feel will grow as more people get in contact with our music in the future.

Karl: In addition to what Johannes mentioned, I am personally looking forward to see the overall progression of the band in every aspect, such as sound, stage presence, visual effects and so on. We have a lot of ideas for the future and we are also writing some new songs that we feel will take the band to the next step.

Links:

facebook.com/StructuralDisorder
structuraldisorder.com
youtube.com/structuraldisorder
instagram.com/structuraldisorder
twitter.com/StrDisOfficial

Bands, send your music submissions for the Progstravaganza compilation series to info@prog-sphere.com

Bulbs on Progstravaganza compilation

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: Bulbs

Bulbs (hailing from Liverpool, UK) bring together adventurous music-making with information and sound samples chosen to challenge the audience to look around them at the world in which they are living. A ‘totalist’ project Bulbs seeks to challenge its audiences with complex cyclical rhythms and deep underlying thematic structures whilst simultaneously presenting a hedonistic, seductive, immersive and ultimately compelling musical experience, accessible to all. Presenting their live performances with specially made synchronised projected visuals, Bulbs specialise in creating atmospheric and consciousness-expanding experiences for audiences.

How did you come to do what you do?

Neil has been playing and writing music since about the age of seven, starting with the guitar and moving onto keyboards (piano/synths/church organ etc). As a young lad he got interested in Progressive Rock artists and bands such as Mike Oldfield, Yes and ELP, and they, along with a long stint as a treble and later a tenor in a church choir, were essential in his early musical education. He later got interested in minimalist music and eventually completed a Masters degree in Music (Composition). For many years a solo guitarist, over the last ten years he has been more involved in performing with ensembles and in collaboration with other musicians, such as The Neil Campbell Collective, Sense of Sound Singers, vocalist Anne Taft, cellist Nicole Collarbone, singer-songwriter Stuart Todd and more recently with guitarist Carlo Bowry (Wizards of Twiddly/Muffin Men), electronic musician Gordon Ross, The Perri and Neil Quartet (with Perri Alleyne-Hughes) and of course Bulbs.

Andy’s Dad was a multi-instrumentalist in various Ukrainian folk ensembles for a while. Then he bought Andy an acoustic guitar for his birthday and for him it went from there.

Joey realised at a very early age that he was a drummer. Adam Ant was the realisation – Drums, Drums and more Drums …

Marty says he was never told to be quiet while thrashing about on a guitar listening to The Clash and The Pistols and the John Peel show. He picked up a bass at thirteen and became a bass player because no one else he knew had one. Then he got an old battered drum kit when he was sixteen and became a drummer. Marty jammed with anyone he could for the next few years doing the odd recording session. He played with singer songwriter David Gray for three years then formed Zeb in Liverpool and spaced out for ten years. Mainly he played bass but later on got more involved with sampling and electronic sounds. Marty loves making music using computers. Squelches and bleeps still excite him. Over the last few years he has worked with Mulakong in Spain, The Hatband, Snappertronics and his current electronic dub outfit Babadub. He was asked to record Bulbs for a demo by Joey who was also in Zeb. After that he was persuaded to get more involved with the production of the album and organizing rhythms and textures for live shows.

What is your first musical memory?

Neil was told by his Mum that in the pushchair when he was about 2 years old a lady commented on his sense of rhythm when he was singing to himself in the Post Office queue… From very early on he always sought out new ways to make music – little electronic toys, drums, bottles, tin whistles etc. So music was always there… He used to sit in his grandparents parlour with their old record player playing the LPs they had there – Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, Chet Atkins etc. The first memory that relates to listening to the music that would help shape his late style was listening on headphones to Mike Oldfield’s Hergest Ridge on cassette when on holiday in Cornwall when he was about 10.

Andy’s first musical memory was listening to ‘Lily the Pink’ (The Scaffold) with his sister doing the ironing in the summertime. He says it seemed rather prescient.

Joey used to sing along to ‘Without You’ by Harry Nilsson when he was about two years old.

Marty’s first musical memory was listening to Blueberry Hill and My Old Man’s a Dustman on old 78s in his parents.

Bulbs from Liverpool

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

Neil takes his influence from lots of other music he listens to in all sorts of styles from Prog to Singer-Songwriter, Electronic music to Contemporary classical and Jazz.

Andy says ‘the good, the bad and the ugly… It all has an influence – stands to reason…’

Joey believes that nature is the key. Good future drumming can always be heard in a tree or in the movement of a machine.

Marty loves the simplicity of dub reggae – how a song can be transformed using the mixing desk as an instrument. Deep repetitive bass. Brian Eno still does it for him. He’s into electronic stuff but he likes traditional folk music too. He says he doesn’t listen to much Prog.

What message does the song on our Progstravaganza compilation carry?

It’s message cannot be described in words – that is why it is a piece of music.

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

When Bulbs write music they bring together fragmentary ideas they have and these ideas are embellished and expanded upon in rehearsal until a fixed composition emerges. The starting point is a trio of Neil, Andy and Joey. Then they bring in Marty to provide extra production and electronics, refine some of the arrangements and add further ideas. Aside from this there is no specific system to create the music – but we know what Bulbs music sounds like – it is not too jazzy, it often involves complex time signatures, and it treads a line between raw energy and lush multi-layered ear candy.

What is your method of songwriting?

As above, the band bring everything they know about music into the process of making it. And they develop it in service to the emerging music, keeping egos out of the way of the creative process.

How do you see your music evolving?

Bulbs members each have different ideas about this and we all work on different musical projects outside the band which allow them to stretch out to different goals. Within Bulbs there is not a definite plan as to what happens next. Bulbs have been working with synchronised projected visuals and would like to take that show out across the UK and into Europe. But, also, they have been developing some new songs, following on from the On CD, and may be looking to expand the line up with some other musicians.

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

Focus on what makes you happy in music-making and forget about the ‘market’. Recognition or commercial success would be happy additional pleasures but they are not the main goal. The goal is make great and interesting music that you are pleased with and which fulfills you, and to do your best to share that music with as many people as you can get to.

What are you looking forward to?

Neil is looking forward to completing a solo album, which he has been working on over the last year or so, with Marty producing some of the tracks. This is planned for release later in 2014 and combines elements of classical music with jazz fusion, electronica and prog.

The band are all looking forward to the Summertime – and perhaps a Bulbs tour of Europe.

Links:

http://www.bulbsmusic.com/

Bands, send your music submissions for the Progstravaganza compilation series to info@prog-sphere.com

Magg on Progstravaganza compilation

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: Magg

MAGG is a progressive rock / metal band from Cancun that seeks answers to the principal questions of humanity. Its first album, a double-disc LP, released in 2013, has been applauded by specialized critics praising its symphonic sound and comparing it to leading bands like Dream Theater. 

Read the Progstravaganza Questionnaire with Magg below.

How did you come to do what you do?

A calling we guess. What did Droctulft see in Ravenna to abandon his kindred?

What did Saul of Tarsus see to become the prey instead of being the hunter? Some of us took our first music class very late and decided to quit our jobs soon after. The others grew up with an instrument, almost foretelling their future.

What is your first musical memory?

Each member had his own approach to music. As a band we have been always focused to perform original songs, however, in our very first jams we played Dream Theater and Genesis songs.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

The Double-slit experiment for quantum particles shows how these particles act different when observed. The Universe modifies its behavior when it is observed, like a revelation for the observer.

For many artists, “art” comes from an intellectual exercise, but music is an enigma.  How do we know minor is sad and major happy? Why can abstract things without symbols communicate feelings? Even Schopenhauer said music comes from a true inspiration. 

So music comes from revelation, as Johann Sebastian Bach knew when he wrote “Jesu Juva” (Jesus help me) at the beginning of his manuscripts.

What message does the song on our Progstravaganza compilation carry?

“Chinese Room” is a fourteen-minute song that tells the story of Maria, a pop-star who discovers she is a machine.

The lyrics cover these points:

a) Alan Turing’s test as the solution for the question: “Can machines think?”

b) John Searle’s challenge to the test with the “CHINESE ROOM” thought.

c) Nobel laureate Sir John Eccles’ dualist model that includes a brain and a self. (Soul?)

d) The nature of reality.

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

We have a formula: Yito (guitar player) writes a sketch-song and it is presented, modified and completed at the rehearsal room.

What is your method of songwriting?

To sit and wait.

How do you see your music evolving?

Our first songs were oriented on solos and instrumental passages; however, our recent material is based in structures and atmospheres.

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

Every musician should follow Daniel Gildenlöw’s advice/joke: Give up! Get an education, get a job!

But if you (we) still continue, it may come from a truly “inspired” purpose.

What are you looking forward to?

To someday, be able to touch minds with our lyrics and to touch souls with our music. (Or vice versa.)

Links:

http://maggband.com/

Vermilion

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: Vermilion

Vermilion was formed in 2009 when guitarist Timmy Segers and keyboardist MichaelPenson met and discovered they shared an interest in progressive music. With drummer Tom Vansteenkiste and Tom Everaert they play a unique brand of instrumental progressive metal that incorporates odd time signatures and a wide range of influences including jazz and fusion. Timmy answers the Progstravaganza Questionnaire.

How did you come to do what you do?

I myself (guitarist) started playing when I was 15. At first I was mainly influenced by Randy Rhoads, Criss Oliva and Alex Skolnick. I never had a formal music education but I was interested in music theory by default so I indulged a lot in that. I later became interested in progressive music through Dream Theater and heavier things such as Meshuggah; Animals As Leaders, Special Defects, Chimp Spanner, Amogh Symphony, Cloudkicker, Death, Opeth, Atheist and Exivious would follow. Along with that I got really interested in jazz fusion. Greats such as Allan Holdsworth, Guthrie Govan, Greg Howe, Pat Metheny, Frank Gambale and John McLaughlin still inspire me a lot. I’m also a graphic designer and like works by arists such as Hugh Syme, Storm thorgerson and John Baizley. I’m responsible for most of Vermilion’s artwork.

As for the rest of the band, our keyboard player Michael comes from a musical family where both parents and now also his sister are professional musicians. Michael himself is actually a classicaly trained violin player and also plays in an orchestra. He also got interested in prog metal through Dream Theater and Opeth. Some of his other influences include Queen, Porcupine Tree and Pat Metheny. He’s also an educated music producer and is responsible for the bulk of our recordings.

Our drummer Tom hails from a more funky and hip hop/jazz oriented scene, but his heavier influences also include Faith No more (and associated Mike Patton projects such as Mr Bungle), Meshuggah, Death, Special Defects, Zu, Shining and Hella (Zach Hill). He plays drums in another proggy/groovy band called Carneia, composes some solo stuff and sings in a Faith No More tribute band.

Our bassist Tom was mainly into technical death metal and proggy power metal. Influences include Death, Opeth and Symphony X. He has his own technical death metal band and has done some work in gothic metal bands as well.

What is your first musical memory?

My first musical memories that I really liked were some heavier 90′s cartoon opening themes. Things such as Mighty Max, Swat Kats, Biker Mice From Mars and Spider-Man (1994). I also really liked the Jurassic Park soundtrack by John Williams and the Tim Burton Batman soundtrack by Danny Elfman.

What does progress in music represent to you?

To me progress in music simply means that we should always be open to different and ever changing influences. We should look beyond certain subcultures and see what new things we can create. This certainly applies to the metal scene, where there are a lot of people who would rather live in the past I think. Or at least that’s the case where I come from.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

See question 1.

What message does the song on our latest Progstravaganza compilation carry?

The song doesn’t really have a clear message since we’re an instrumental band. The titles mainly come from how the song is composed or what feeling it evokes. We usually tend to like “strange” and “uncanny” elements in music wether it be by unusual time signatures or weird tonalities so I guess that’s a feeling that we would like to carry over to others.

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

I usually come up with riffs and ideas since it’s still a metal band, which is guitar oriented music, and I’m the only guitarist. We work on everything together though which usually makes it more interesting. Also, everyone is still encouraged to contribute.

What is your method of songwriting?

See former question.

How do you see your music evolving?

There are new influences creeping into our music every day. Game soundtracks is something that I’m also really into. Some of my favorites include Metroid, Machinarium, the Final Fantasy series, Ecco The Dolphin, Chrono Trigger and many more. Drum n’ bass and breakcore is also something I can appreciate. I like artists such as Aphex Twin, Nerve, Drumcorps and The Algorithm. I even like some Enya or Brian Eno from time to time.

I would like to think that our music is maturing too. Lately we’re more inclined to leave the overly technical “cut and paste” approach behind and focus on the song itself (which will still be pretty technical of course).

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

-

What are you looking forward to?

We’re looking forward to playing as many shows as possible. We recently played some high profile clubs in Belgium such as the “Vooruit” in Ghent and would like to see where this is going. It would be cool to play some festivals in the future. Euroblast, Graspop, Progpower Europe and Dour Festival are some that come to mind.

Vermilion on the web:

https://www.facebook.com/vermilion.the.band

http://vermilion.bandcamp.com/

https://soundcloud.com/vermilion_the_band

Shineback

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: Shineback

Simon Godfrey is best known as one of the founding members of UK’s progressive rock band Tinyfish. Shineback is his new project where he, with the help of several guest musicians (Matt Stevens, Dec Burke, Henry Rogers, Andy Ditchfield, Hywel Benett, Paul Worwood, Danny Claire and Tamara Tanche), handles all the vocals and instrumental work. “Rise Up Forgotten, Return Destroyed” is a concept centered “on an insomniac called Dora who takes a video camera into one of her very rare sleeping dreams and blogs about what she sees while in that dream-world in order to help understand and maybe cure her sleep disorder. What Dora finds however is much more than she expected.”

Giving up playing live (with Tinyfish) due to the hearing condition that would possibly led him to a hearing loss, Simon “wanted to write an album which came from the heart and chose to ignore the boundaries of genre and not give a damn if it was commercially or critically viable.

Following the Shineback’s appearance on Progstravaganza XV: Ascension, here is the questionnaire answered by Simon.

How did you come to do what you do?

I had no choice. All I possess is a huge ego, the attention span of a goldfish and a pair of 70s high heeled Bowie boots.

What is your first musical memory?

Listening to my mum’s copy of the album Up, Up And Away by the 5th Dimension as a 5 year old. It had a track called Pattern People on it which still gives me goose bumps to this day simply because of the way the vocals blend together.

What does progress in music represent to you?

Anything that ignores convention and boundaries. Tenure and tradition are the enemy of innovation. The one exception to this is chocolate ice cream; that can remain unchanged.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

I have a glove puppet called Harriet. She tells me what to do and I follow her every command (except when she tells me to kill people with her magic axe).

What message does the song on our latest Progstravaganza compilation carry?

The message is in code and if I were to divulge the content to the world, I would have to use Harriet’s magic axe upon all of humanity. This would made me sad but it could improve my chances of finding a parking space where I live.

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

I am a detail junkie so I tend to spend a lot of time refining the structure and instrumentation of the piece as I go. As a result, the music I make is closer to Darwinian evolution than it is to momentary inspiration (although that does happen on occasion). You also have to know when not to fiddle with something when it’s already as good as it is ever going to sound.

What is your method of songwriting?

Usually I begin either with a chord sequence on an acoustic or an interesting sample or loop in my sound library. Both act as the foundation of almost all the music that I write.

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

If you love music, just do it and forget about fame and fortune. I guarantee that you will NEVER be happy if you crave global recognition. Those that make it are rarely the artists they were once they become famous.

What are you looking forward to?

Porn on the internet.

Buy Rise Up Forgotten, Return Destroyed from Bad Elephant Music.

ascensionfeat

PROGSTRAVAGANZA XV: Ascension Is Out

Merry Progmas, everyone!

Along with the holiday spirit we present to you the brand new Progstravaganza XV compilation titled “Ascension”, hoping to make your holiday season a little bit more prog.

This sampler is comprised of 33 songs in total, showcasing artists all the way from UK down to India to South Africa. That pretty much says everything about our determination to showcase bands from absolutely every corner of the world.

The great cover art of the sampler was once again designed by Linden Artwork, check their website and ask for assistance if you are in need of the album art, poster or any form of graphic design. The compilation also includes PDF artwork with all the participants presented visually.

Make sure to visit the website on a regular basis as we will be bringing new features in the coming days. We are already open for submissions for the next part of the compilation series, so if you create music or know someone who does and who might be interested in taking part on our sampler, contact us at info@prog-sphere.com

Have a great holiday season and Happy New Year!

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Oneironaut

Using a method entirely of their own conception, Oneironaut takes bits and pieces of musical histories past to create a new sound that is best described as a complex type of loop-centric rhythm based ambient music. “Occult Fascination” has a plethora of instruments used, from electric guitars to 4-string Irish tenor banjo and also includes a wide range of genre influenced riffs, from Progressive and Death Metal to Jazz, Bluegrass, Funk, and Folk; illustrating Oneironaut’s unique playing style and exceptional musicianship.

http://oneir0naut.bandcamp.com/